Fun Fact: EDMS:// is to ARS as LDAP:// (or GC://) is to Active Directory

If your organization is anything like mine, you would have a rebellion on your hands if you said that you were taking native AD privileges away, and that any old scripts that relied on ADSI wouldn’t work anymore, but, hey, look – PowerShell awesomeness in the Quest Active Directory Management Shell!

Yeah. Don’t do that. There’s no reason to – ARS has an ADSI provider that works enough like the native AD one that it can be used pretty much the same way.

Here’s a peace offering to accompany the announcement that native AD privileges will be a thing of the past: they can simply do a find on LDAP://whateverserver and replace it with EDMS://yourARSloadbalancer. If their scripts have it in the form of LDAP://distinguishednameonly, it’s simply a matter of replacing LDAP:// with EDMS://. Same with GC:// (uses a global catalog server instead of any old domain controller like LDAP:// will) – just replace it with EDMS://.

I can’t guarantee that this will work 100% of the time, but my colleagues who have tried it report that it has for them, and they are heartily grateful that I’m not making them learn PowerShell yet.

Make sure the script is run on a machine with the ADSI provider for the correct version of ARS installed. Which is installed when you install the Quest AD Management Shell. Which they might later discover is awesome for quick things they used to write nasty VBScripts for.

Related Fun Fact: if you know the DN of an object, referring to it by [adsi]"EDMS://distinguishedname" is usually WAY faster than Get-QADObject -Identity distinguishedname. In my environment, from the interactive shell in PowerGUI, the ADSI way consistently takes less than 0.1 ms, while the nifty cmdlet way takes about 150 ms (YIKES!). The convenience of QAD cmdlets has its price. For command-line one-offs, though, they’re a whole lot of wonderful.

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