Windows Fabric Gone Wild!

Does anyone know WHY Windows Fabric would generate logs like mad? Our Lync Front End servers have about 10 of these per DAY right now. I’ve not turned off the logging or changed it to circular as I want to have the logs on hand to send Microsoft if needed – instead, I’m moving them over to an empty volume with this script running as a scheduled task each night.

if (-not (Test-Path "E:\Windows Fabric Traces")) {
	New-Item -ItemType Directory -Name "E:\Windows Fabric Traces"
}
$fabrictraces = Get-ChildItem "c:\ProgramData\Windows Fabric\Fabric\log\Traces" | where { $_.name -like "fabric_traces_*"} | sort -Descending LastWriteTime
#skip the first two - one of them is the trace file in use, the other is the most recently full one
for ($i=2; $i -lt $($fabrictraces.count); $i++) { $fabrictraces[$i] | Move-Item -Destination "E:\Windows Fabric Traces\" }

$leasetraces = Get-ChildItem "c:\ProgramData\Windows Fabric\Fabric\log\Traces" | where { $_.name -like "lease_traces_*"} | sort -Descending LastWriteTime
for ($i=2; $i -lt $($leasetraces.count); $i++) { $leasetraces[$i] | Move-Item -Destination "E:\Windows Fabric Traces\" }

However, this is only treating the symptoms, not the cause, so the search continues…

Thoughts From a Bot Named Flinch

CrashHow’s that for the title of a blog article! Apparently I’ve been reading too much Huffington Post or something. For the record, I never read that website. I have standards, as low as they may be.

So back to the title and the point of this post. Are there actually hidden log files that could cause some unintended problems with your Lync 2013 environment? Absolutely. I am assuming you are already aware that IIS logs could fill up your local hard drive. It is also a good idea to keep an eye on the trace files created by OCS Logger and Snooper.

However, there are some hidden logfiles that are created by Windows Fabric that could very much fill up your hard drive and it would be a decent challenge to find them. If you are unaware, Lync 2013 sits on top of a technology called Windows Fabric. For a…

View original post 381 more words

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